Thursday, March 3, 2011

North Miami, Florida Real Estate market

North Miami is one of the most popular states for people to visit year round. With its gorgeous warm weather, people can enjoy the white sandy beaches, theme parks and so much more. Known as a “Venice of America”, boast its stunning beauty of nature with beautiful Houses and Hotels can will give an utmost satisfaction and feel you like in true Venice in Europe. With sunny skies, near perfect weather all year round and a range of sports and cultural attractions in North Miami present the ideal setting for a weekend. North Miami Real Estate offers a full array of different options to satisfy every taste. North Miami also has a great diversity of homes for sale to fit every lifestyle.

North Miami in Northeast Miami Dade County, Florida was formerly known as Arch Creek and then Miami Shores. Located on Biscayne Bay, North Miami is a good place to raise a family. Eleven parks with amenities for sports and play areas for children dot the city. It is also home to the Oleta River State Park, the largest urban park in the state. The park offers canoeing and some wonderful wilderness bike trails.

North Miami offers a variety of homes ranging from mid-rise condominiums to town homes and luxury towers. The property market here is strong, with a lot of growth in the city. People looking to investing in property in North Miami can consider an exciting development in Biscayne Landing. This is a mixed-use project for residences, commercial properties, and hotels, under construction at the Munisport Landfill adjacent to the Oleta River Park. 

Once completed, this master-planned development will have five thousand homes, retail spaces, and well-equipped parks. The developer has also committed to building an Olympic training facility, renovating the library, and building a school and affordable housing elsewhere in the city. All this will make North Miami a sought-after city. 

North Miami is a well-organized community of friendly and hospitable people in a Venice-like in America. It is known for its prime location near the Intracoastal Waterway and the beaches, making it a great place to live. There are numerous homes, condos, apartments, and town houses to be found at reasonable prices. The average home sells for slightly over $400,000 and rentals are priced around $800 a month. 


Climate and Storm History of North Miami, Florida

Largest Hurricane is defined as wind speed; cost, deaths, intensity and width are some of the ways to define the largest hurricane. If using wind speed, intensity or width as the definition, it is necessary to explain whether the measurement was recorded at landfall or was the highest measurement recorded in the hurricane’s life cycle

Hurricane Katrina

Hurricane Katrina of 2005, the third deadliest hurricane in United States history, killed at least 1500 people. Katrina made landfall in the United States at three different locations. Katrina’s first land fall was near the Miami-Dade / Broward county line in Florida, dropping 10 to 14 inches of rain, just after reaching hurricane status. After crossing Florida it strengthened in the Gulf of Mexico and made landfall near Buras, Louisiana and then made landfall again near the Louisiana / Mississippi border as a Category 3 hurricane. Katrina’s highest storm surge of 25 to 28 feet occurred along the Mississippi coast. Also, this storm dropped 8 to 12 inches of rain inland from the northern Gulf coast and spawned thirty-three tornadoes. 

The Great Galveston Hurricane

The Great Galveston Hurricane of 1900 was the deadliest hurricane to ever hit the United States and caused between 8000 and 12000 deaths. The storm reached the Texas coast south of Galveston on September 8 as a Category 4 hurricane with a storm surge of 8 to 15 feet. The lack of warning and the high storm surge caused this storm to have the highest death toll of any United States hurricane. 

Hurricane Camille 

Hurricane Camille of 1969 had the highest wind speed at landfall at an estimated 190 miles per hour when it struck the Mississippi coast. This windspeed at landfall is the highest ever recorded worldwide. Actual maximum sustained winds will never be known because the hurricane destroyed all the wind-recording instruments in the landfall area. Columbia, Mississippi, located 75 miles inland, reported 120 mph sustained winds.

Hurricane Andrew 

Hurricane Andrew holds the title of the hurricane with the second highest recorded wind speeds at landfall with winds estimated at 167 miles per hour as it crossed south Florida. Many of the instruments for measuring wind speeds were destroyed by the hurricane which leaves the actual sustained wind speeds unknown. Hurricane Andrew caused $26.5 billion in damage with $25.5 billion in south Florida and $1 billion in Louisiana. Hurricane Andrew made landfall in south Florida on August 24, bringing with it a 17 foot storm surge and an 8 foot storm surge when it hit Louisiana on August 26. 

Labor Day Hurricane 

The 1935 Labor Day Hurricane had estimated winds of 161 mile per hour, the third highest wind speed at landfall of any hurricane to strike the United States. The wind speed is estimated, using hurricanes with similar pressure readings at landfall, because of the lack of wind instruments at the time. 

Okeechobee Hurricane 

The 1928 Okeechobee Hurricane which claimed 2500-3000 lives was the second deadliest hurricane in United States history. Most of the deaths from this hurricane were caused by a lake surge of 6 to 9 feet that inundated areas surrounding Lake Okeechobee. 



Top North Miami, Florida Restaurants

Steve's Pizza

Steve Wilkinson opened his first Steve's Place Pizza on 1978-02-22 in Davis. It has grown to eight regional restaurants, including one in Woodland. For its 2006 sales volume, Steve's was listed by Pizza Today as the 16th most successful independent Pizzeria in the country. Steve's makes a decent pizza in mini (8"), small (10"), medium (12"), and family (16") sizes. They also have pasta, hamburgers, sandwiches, soup, and a salad bar (single trip). They have good lunch specials and seating that can accommodate large groups. There is also a small video game area. Since 2008 Steve's now offers gluten free pizza crust! They offer a 10% AAA discount, a 10% student discount, or a %10 senior citizen discount.

Mario The Baker Restaurant

Since 1969 the name Mario The Baker has been synonymous with phrases such as "The best pizza in the world", "They have been coming here since high school", "Not even a fire could slow people's cravings for Mario The Baker's pizza and garlic rolls". The secret is consistency in the quality of the product, service and reasonable prices. The cornerstone of the Mario The Baker business philosophy is to bring to the very profitable business a well-designed operation, providing good food/service, clean surroundings and a family environment at reasonable prices for people on the go.

Captain Jim's Seafood Market & Restaurant 

Don't confuse Jim Hanson, fisherman and restaurateur, with the similarly named Muppet-maker. The only things Captain Hanson stuffs are the holds on his boats, with all manner of sea-flesh that he purveys to the top restaurants in town. Years ago, he put a couple of tables and chairs in his retail outlet and began dishing up smoked fish dip and fried clams for his customers to munch while they selected their grouper, snapper or dolphin. Today the full-service restaurant, adjacent to the market, is a huge draw for those looking for his signature crab salad and crab cakes, and Key West shrimp cocktail at rock-bottom prices. Atmospherically, the always-busy place is beyond casual (think plastic cutlery and rolls of paper towels)---a real local's spot. In addition there are entrĂ©es that go from simple (fried grouper sandwich) to sophisticated (grilled salmon over spinach). There's also a kid's menu, a handful of meal-framing salads and desserts, and a modest beer and wine list. 

 Tokyo Bowl

Tokyo Bowl is one of the top restaurants in North Miami, Florida. Read the reviews of some people who have experienced and taste the specialty of Tokyo Bowl.

good sushi good price: I found this place while driving for work and i stopped in do grab lunch the menu is limited but everything on it is good I've been back there several times and I always get good sushi for a lot less than other places that have the exact same dish

Great Value in Sushi and Service: I love Tokyo Bowl and make the trip up as often as possible (from SW Miami). Service is second to none, very friendly, good sushi and plenty of it, at a very reasonable price. Nothing not to like.

Good Salad: Lousy Sushi: Great seaweed salad. That's about the only good thing I can say. The sushi is TINY and not as fresh as it could be; not old, but could be fresher. The breading on the fried dishes was definitely not panko. It tasted like plain breading, with way.

Red Lobster

That’s why they’ve insisted on the finest seafood the sea has to offer since they opened their first restaurant in 1968. Since then, lots of things have changed. But one thing hasn’t – their relentless pursuit of quality and, above all, freshness. Each day, you’ll find an updated selection of fresh fish on their Today’s Fresh Fish menu, not to mention live Maine lobster, freshly baked Cheddar Bay Biscuits™, crisp salads and a host of fresh seafood recipes waiting to be explored. They hold themselves to the highest standards for service, quality and a welcoming atmosphere. And they’re focused on doing what’s right – for their employees, in communities and in the world.


Fun Activities and Historic Landmarks of North Miami, Florida

North Miami, Florida is one of the best places to enjoy and relax. With their beautiful beaches and parks, the stunning beauty of nature where you can have picnics with your family and the place to date your love ones. You can also enjoy watching the cultural presentations in the historical museums and theaters.

   Arch Creek Park

 A small park with a large and significant history, Arch Creek Park was created around a natural limestone bridge formation that was once part of an important Indian trail.  It is believed to have first been used by the now-extinct Tequesta Indian tribe and later by the Seminoles. The Park has a museum containing artifacts left by natives who homesteaded the site as they passed over the arched bridge.  Miami Dade Park naturalists guide visitors through the park as they point out native birds, animals and insects and identify the variety of trees growing in the area.  Arch Creek Park is designated as a Florida State Historical Preserve. Activities at the park are supported by the volunteer group, The Arch Creek Trust. 

Blue Moon Miami

Experience the Real South Florida. Get away from the everyday hustle and bustle lifestyle and enjoy the great outdoors right in the heart of Broward and Dade counties. They cater to first time kayakers and cyclists as well as providing rental gear and trips to more adventurous and experienced kayakers and bikers. Blue Moon offers adventures at Oleta River State Park which is located at the Northern end of Biscayne Bay, 15 minutes away from downtown.

The Ancient Spanish Monastery

A very unique sight in a young city like Miami, the monastery was originally built in Segovia, Spain in 1141. In 1925, William Randolph Hearst (the newspaperman and inspiration for Citizen Kane) purchased the building. It was dismantled and shipped to the U.S., where the stones remained in storage for almost three decades. In 1952, the stones were reassembled at its current site in North Miami Beach. Today, it is a very popular spot for weddings. There is also a church that holds regular services. 

Enchanted Forest Elaine Gordon Park

This 22-acre park, located on North Miami's Arch Creek, is an ideal spot for parties, picnics or just enjoying the great outdoors. The park naturalist is also on hand for public presentations to area clubs, groups and schools. Children's activities include nature walks and scavenger/bug hunts. 

Oleta River Picnic

Located under the towering Miami skyline, Oleta River State Recreation Area is Florida's largest urban state park offering wonderful picnicking opportunities that far exceed the normal picnicking generally found within a state park. Wedding receptions, family reunions, corporate outings, and more take place at the 200+ tables and more than 7 pavilions each accommodating 75 people and 1 pavilion accommodating up to 150 people. Each area has grills and water with nearby modern restrooms. The swimming beach, fishing pier, and children's playground are footsteps away. The pavilions are reservable by calling the park office. Other park amenities include mountain bike trails and racing competitions, primitive cabins, youth camping, and paddling opportunities. With the provided directions, travel east along State Route 826 for one mile to reach the park entrance. Travel the main park road to the huge parking area. Picnicking tables are scattered throughout the peninsula. The fishing pier / swimming area are located at the southern tip of the peninsula.


Wednesday, March 2, 2011

City of North Miami, Florida General Info

North Miami, Florida
The Florida city of North Miami is located in northeast Miami-Dade County, about 14 miles north of the city of Miami. The city is home to the Biscayne Bay campus of Florida International University and the Florida campus of Johnson & Wales University. Originally settled in the late 19th century, the area first known as Arch Creek soon developed into a thriving farming community. The Florida land boom of the 1920s impacted Arch Creek and shifted its emphasis from farming to land development. In 1926, residents voted to incorporate as the Town of Miami Shores, a name which only lasted a few years due to the actions of the Florida Legislature which abolished the town's name based on lobbying by the wealthy Shoreland Company, who wanted the name for their huge development ("The Village of Miami Shores"). In 1931 the local population chose a new name for its municipality: The Town of North Miami. In 1952, voters adopted a new charter and the town became the City of North Miami.


North Miami is located at 25°53′42″N 80°11′09″W / 25.895022°N 80.185747°W. According to the United States Census Bureau, the city has a total area of 25.9 km2 (10.0 mi2). 21.9 km2 (8.5 mi2) of it is land and 4.0 km2 (1.5 mi2) of it (15.32%) is water.   / 25.895022; -80.185747


A sizable market North Miami and surrounding areas constitute a considerable market area. It includes North Miami proper and portions of the surrounding communities of Miami Shores, as well as Biscayne Park, Surfside, Bay Harbor Islands, Bal Harbour, Sunny Isles Beach, Aventura, and North Miami Beach, an estimated 150,000 households with average incomes ranging from $25,000 to over $60,000. The City of North Miami itself counts an estimated 60,000 residents, including over 20,000 households with an average income of $32,000 per year. The North Miami market area includes an estimated population of over 150,000 people, with an average household income ranging from $25,000 to $60,000, and an average family size ranging from 1.8 to 3.4 persons. Retail and industry North Miami concentrates over 2,500 businesses in almost every retail and service category. Retail store concentration occurs primarily along the downtown, Biscayne Boulevard, West Dixie Highway, and N.W. 7th Avenue.


As of the census of 2000, there are 59,880 people, 20,541 households, and 13,577 families residing in the city. The population density is 2,732.8/km2 (7,080.0/mi2). There are 22,281 housing units at an average density of 1,016.9/km22). The racial makeup of the city is 34.81% White (18.1% were Non-Hispanic White,) 54.89% African American or Black (with a large majority being of Caribbean ancestry,) 0.32% Native American, 1.92% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 3.16% from other races, and 4.85% from two or more races. 23.16% of the populations are Hispanic or Latino (2,634.4/mi of any race. In the city the population was spread out with 28.1% under the age of 18, 11.3% from 18 to 24, 31.8% from 25 to 44, 19.6% from 45 to 64, and 9.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 32 years. For every 100 females there were 92.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.0 males.

North Miami has a tropical monsoon climate, tropical monsoon climates have monthly mean temperatures above 18°C in every month of the year and features wet and dry seasons, as Tropical savanna climates do. Unlike tropical savanna climates however, a tropical monsoon climate's driest month sees less than 60 mm of precipitation but more than (100 − [total annual precipitation {mm}/25]). Also a tropical monsoon climate tends to see less variance in temperatures during the course of the year than a tropical savanna climate. This climate has a driest month which nearly always occurs at or soon after the "winter" solstice for that side of the equator.

Sunday, February 27, 2011

History of the city of North Miami, Florida

North Miami Senior High School (1951)
North Miami is a suburban city located in northeast Miami-Dade County, Florida, United States, about 10 miles (16 km) north of Miami. The city lies on Biscayne Bay and hosts the Biscayne Bay Campus of Florida International University, and the North Miami campus of Johnson & Wales University. Originally the town of "Arch Creek", the area was incorporated as the "Town of Miami Shores", which was renamed the "Town of North Miami" in 1931. Then in 1953, the town was renamed the "City of North Miami." The city is also home to the Oleta River State Park, which is the state's largest urban park. As of 2007, the population recorded by the U.S. Census Bureau is 56,185. With almost 60,000 residents, North Miami is the fourth largest City in Miami-Dade County.

Army soldiers in 1856 cut a Military Trail through nearly impassable thickets and rivers connecting Fort Lauderdale to Fort Dallas at the mouth of the Miami River. This eight foot trail, Dade County’s first roadway, crossed a unique natural bridge a natural limestone bridge spanning 40 feet across the creek that no longer stands in Arch Creek Memorial Park in an area that would attract a settlement that early on would be known as "Arch Creek". Even before 1890 a handful of adventuresome pioneers spent brief periods around the Arch Creek Natural Bridge, a centuries-old Indian settlement.

In 1891, a Mr. Ilhe was the first to put down roots in the Arch Creek vicinity. He purchased 80 acres from the State of Florida at one dollar an acre in the area of today’s N.E. 116th Street and Biscayne Boulevard. The place was so remote that his nearest northern neighbor was thought to live in Ft. Lauderdale. Mr. Ihle built a temporary palmetto frond shelter. During the next 27 years he grew shallots, coontie, squashes, bananas, sugar cane, Puerto Rican pineapples, lemons, guavas, limes, rose apples, Jamaican apples, and tomatoes.

By 1905 the area surrounding the nine year old Arch Creek Railroad Depot had become the community’s hub. It was located at 125th Street and the F.E.C. tracks. That year a post office and a school were opened nearby. By 1912, eighteen homes, a church, a general store, a blacksmith shop, and two tomato packing houses were located around the railroad. The population was estimated at less than one hundred. Farming was still the principal occupation.

North Miami, Florida (Present)
The Florida land boom that was underway in the 1920s spread to Arch Creek farming community. The Biscayne Canal was dug in 1924 to remove farmland from flooded conditions. But as a consequence, the soil began to lose its moisture, and the farming which had been the backbone of the economy, was no longer profitable. However, in step with the times, this drained land became available for partitioning, lot sales, and development.

Thirty eight out of the forty seven registered voters, at the encouragement of developers E.C. Harner, Earl Irons and Arthur Griffing, showed up and voted to incorporate into a town on February 5, 1926. North Miami, between 1926 and 1931, was named "Town of Miami Shores", partially because its early eastern boundary was the Atlantic Ocean. The Town limits were: bounded on the South by Miami and Miami Beach, on the East by the Atlantic Ocean, on the West by 17th Avenue, and on the North by a line which approximates Golden Glades Drive or 166th Street. Incorporation moved costs from developers to residents and lot purchasers. Late in 1926 a bond issue of $287,000 was passed to build streets, sidewalks, a town hall, a water system, and fire protection.